The Pelter was a ship that was deliberately beached at the Warren in the 19th century and used a coastguard station. It was home to nine families, among them the Andersons. John ‘Chopper’ Anderson was the Folkestone town crier in the early 20th century and a well known character in the town. Alan Couchman-Sawyer, who is related to Chopper Anderson, has been doing a lot of research on his family, the Pelter and the cottages that superseded it. He has

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14/04/12

Thomas Hennell

His contemporaries regarded him as a genius. Academics have called him one of the 20th centuries greatest British watercolourists. Some have described him as the English Van Gogh. Thomas Hennell may have been all these things, but he was certainly an enigma and, even now, something of an unknown. Born 1903 in Ridley in north west Kent, Hennell was schooled in Berkshire and went on to study at Regent Street Polytechnic. He worked as an art teacher then became a

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According to Hasted (vol 8 pp 152-188) these feasts were held on Christmas Eve in honour of St Rumbald, who was the Patron Saint of the local fishermen. Originally funded by the sale of the largest whiting from each catch throughout the year, the Master of each boat provided a feast for his own crew, the fish being called “Rumbald Whiting”. By Hasted’s time this sale of whiting to fund the annual feasting had gone, but the fisherfolk still got

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Was Folkestone the scene of a desperate battle between Britons and Anglo Saxons in the C5th which saw the death and burial of the British prince Vortimer? A local story records the battle and a reference to the ancient conflict and burial is found in S.E. Winbolt’s ‘Roman Folkestone’.   An alternative account also has the Saxon leader Horsa buried at the East cliff. Please let us know of any further reference or stories that you have come across and we will share

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