Part of a Roman flagon, with handle and neck remaining.  From the original 1924 excavations.

This post is in: Late Iron Age to Roman (200 BC-AD 450)

One of four fragments of a Roman statuette of a Mother Goddess, in pipeclay. This piece is the arm of a wicker-work chair, within which the Mother is sitting.

This post is in: Late Iron Age to Roman (200 BC-AD 450)

22/08/11

Hare brooch

An exquisite late 2nd or 3rd century Roman copper alloy brooch in the shape of a hare, found at the Villa site in August. For the Romans, the hare was associated with Diana, Goddess of wild places and the hunt. Hares symbolised fertility and springtime (today they maqsuerade as the Easter Bunny!). Eating their flesh was considered to improve potency, and Pliny the Elder wrote that after a meal of hare his vigour was restored for nine days. A hare brooch might

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This post is in: Late Iron Age to Roman (200 BC-AD 450)

11/07/11

Quernstones

Two broken quernstones recovered in 2010.  These are made from the local greensand rock (exposed in Copt point).  More than one hundred quernstones have been recovered from the excavations of 2010-2011 and there is good evidence to show that these stones were being shaped at the site.  They would have functioned as grind stones to produce flour and prepare other food stuffs.  Folkestone querns seem to have been exported to other parts of Britain and the near Continent. See more

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This post is in: Late Iron Age to Roman (200 BC-AD 450)

A Roman tile stamped ‘CLBR’, the mark of the Roman Imperial navy in British waters – the Classis Britannica.  This is the Roman equivelent to a ‘WD’ mark on more modern military equipment. About twenty such stamps are now known from the East Cliff area of Folkestone but only two have been identified amongst the material from the recent excavations.

This post is in: Late Iron Age to Roman (200 BC-AD 450)

21/02/11

Samian pot

An early Roman samian pot.  Manufactured in Gaul between circa AD 60-80, this was one of three samian vessels, all bearing a potter’s stamp, found placed in the fill of a ditch to the north of the villa.  This ditch, discovered in one of the first trenches opened during the ATU Summer 2010 excavation at East Wear Bay, also contained two quern stones placed in its upper fill.

This post is in: Late Iron Age to Roman (200 BC-AD 450)

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